Kaua‘i Island Tour – Part 06 – North Shore, Kīlauea, Princeville, Hanalei, Hāʻena – Kaua‘i-TV

Kaua‘i Island Tour – Part 06 – North Shore, Kīlauea, Princeville, Hanalei, Hāʻena – Kaua‘i-TV


A breathtaking panorama of natural splendor, the north shore of Kauaʻi is known for its
idyllic beaches, emerald mountains, waterfalls, dramatic coastlines and everyday rainbows that make the region a world-renowned locale. “The north shore offers many places to explore, whether you’re meditating, soul-searching, or simply enjoying the beauty that surrounds you.” Poised on the northernmost point of the Hawaiian Islands, The Kīlauea Lighthouse promises stunning views of this scenic coastline. “A main attraction of the small town, the
lighthouse is also home to the Kīlauea Point National Refuge, which offers over 200 acres of restored habitat to migratory birds and native plants.” Driving on the main road through Kīlauea
town, many historic structures dot the roadside. A few miles before reaching the town of Princeville, Anini Beach has a reputation for its safe
waters and ample facilities, Princeville is a town center that resides
on the bluffs overlooking Hanalei Bay. This north shore community is recognized for its luxurious resorts, manicured residential neighborhoods, and golf courses. “With lush mountains, cascading waterfalls, and fields of taro, Hanalei Valley Lookout is an unforgettable overlook to the magical Hanalei.” Bountiful patches of taro thrive in the sodden fields just beyond the bridge. Entering the iconic Hanalei village, the quaint town is lined with cute shops and restaurants set amongst the panoramic backdrop of Hanalei Bay. “Located on one of the island’s most beautiful beaches, Hanalei Pier provides incredible views of
Hanalei Bay.” This famous crescent-moon shaped bay is the foundation of the town, lined with green mountains and a two-mile stretch of pillowy sand. With a leisurely current, the placid Hanalei River flows from the peaks of Mt. Wai′ale′ale “The Waioli Huiia Church is a landmark in Hanalei town, where traditional services and Hawaiian hymns are sung each Sunday.” Continuing further northbound, the journey begins to what is known as, “the end of the road.” Traversing six bridges and passing through the small communities of Wainiha and Hāʻena The one lane road ahead curves through the wild, flourishing jungle of the most northern area of Kaua’i. Hāʻena Beach Park neighbors Tunnels and has complete facilities. Beach-coming and shelling are fun activities for this scenic beach, next to swimming and snorkeling in the summertime. “Have you ever wanted to go sea-cave exploring? Well on Kaua‘i’s north shore you can do
just that at Maniniholo Dry Cave.” Nestled along the concluding roadway, the pristine Limahuli Valley and Stream are where many of the original native Hawaiians settled. “Marking the end of the road on the north
shore, Ke’e Beach indicates the beginning of the striking Nā Pali coastline, and is the main access point for the Kalalau Trail.” This lagoon-like beach is ideal for snorkeling in the summer, with clear waters and full facilities. Recognized as one of the most famous and treacherous hikes in Hawai’i, the eleven mile Kalalau Trail is a rite of
passage for both locals and tourists. This trail provides the only land access to
the Nā Pali coast, ending at its ultimate destination—Kalalau Beach. Towering as high as 4,000 feet above sea level, the Nā Pali Coast is celebrated worldwide
for its matchless glory, spanning from the northern shore of Keʻe
beach to the western seaside of Polihale. boat and helicopter tours provide impressive views of the regal Nā Pali Coast. The enchanting island of Kaua‘i holds a
rare charisma that attracts visitors from across the globe. From the old fashioned character of the west and south side, to the lively coconut coast and lush panorama of the north shore, this quaint island paradise is brimming with natural attractions, that are guaranteed create memories for a lifetime.